The latest Postal Pulse results are now available

The latest Postal Pulse results are now available.

The annual survey allows employees to share feedback about their work environment and provides leaders with valuable insights toward creating an engaging workplace.

The overall engagement score on this year’s survey is 3.31 on a scale of 1 to 5, a decrease of 0.05 from last year’s score of 3.36. The survey was administered June 14-July 15.

“This year’s Postal Pulse employee survey scores tell us that we need to do more to improve employee engagement — and we are committed to doing so,” said Doug Tulino, deputy postmaster general and chief human resources officer. “I look forward to working with leadership across the organization to empower, equip and engage our employees and put them in the best possible position to succeed.”

A key tenet of the Delivering for America plan is to foster an engaging workplace that supports employee development and retention through expanded training and self-development, strengthening succession planning, improving noncareer employee experiences and other strategies.

Managers and supervisors can improve employee engagement by spending one-on-one time with their employees to discuss workplace needs. Research shows employees feel more engaged when they have the materials, equipment and support they need to be successful in their job; when they are given opportunities to learn and grow; and when they feel like their job is important to the mission of the company.

USPS encourages managers and supervisors to review their survey results, share them with their teams and work together to improve the workplace and ensure employees have opportunities to grow and succeed. Nonbargaining employees can also view the results online.

The Employee Engagement Blue page has tools to help managers and supervisors use the survey results to improve their work environments.


CONTINUE READING AT » USPS News Link


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How about doing something with the horrible managers and supervisors. The worse they are the more they seemed to get promoted. Not engaging at all.

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